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Your round of golf starts with a good breakfast then getting to the golf course at least a hour before you tee off.  Proper Golf Warm Up is important to physically and mentally prepare to play a good round of golf.  Start with stretching your legs, shoulders, core muscles before hitting your first practice ball at the range.  Then, take a wedge and start hitting the short shots and gradually lengthen the swing and hitting other irons before  getting to the driver.  Proceed then to the putting and chipping green.  Start again with puts of about 3-4 feet and get proper alignment and speed before taking longer putts.  Same with a few chips and pitches.  Get the technique down.  Now your ready to tee off.  Take your time and stay relaxed.

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Almost every golfer that plays with the same group of fellow golfers gambles. So some advice on Gambling on Golf.  There is so many different ways to gamble or wager during a round of golf.  Usually your playing with the same golfer and you might have individual, team, 4-some Vs 4-some.   You might even be part of a larger group of 40 or 50 plays that get to gather 3 or so times a week and throw so money in the pot and have different games, usually paying gross and net either individual or team payouts.   From experience teams are arrange into 4 player (low handicap teamed with mid and higher handicaps)  team of equal abilities.  These are safe groups because every ones scores are turned in and new players have to wait until they establish them selves with the group.  Watch out for the individual games within the 4 fore some and individuals playing in other groups.  Make sure you get full handicap.  A lot of lower handicap player hat to give full strokes.  Beware of these players, they’ll take you money with out shedding a tear.  Games like wolf or ship captain crew are designed for the low handicapper.  If you aren’t in there class don’t play there game.  Stay with $.25 a hole or a nasau game like $1-2.00 front, back, and 18 hole.  Get the strokes you need.

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Golf balls, keep price within your abilities and income. Golf can be an expensive game. Ball can cost between $1 to $4 plus a ball. Think about the level of difficulty your playing and your abilities. Don’t play the $4 when you can get same score playing $1 ball. Fortunately golf balls have improved over the last 20 years. If you don’t hit the ball in the fairway and rough is long and tough play cheep. Play ProVxs if your good. You can play them forever. Just keep them clean. I have a practice bag of all ProV and clean them in bleach and they return to bright white, just like new unlike a lot of other ball brands. Being macho on ball purchase can be expensive when your game sucks.

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My golf tips for beginners is go to your local golf Pro and set up a lesson plan.  In the spring most golf course and driving range Pros have individual and group golf lessons.  Sign up for the group  lessons.  If you have a friend that is a low handicap golfer they can get you start, but do go to the local Pro.  That Pro is your ticket to proper  technique and can help you find clubs for the beginner and answer all your questions about how to play.

Start up cost to play golf can get expensive.  So start with some used club.  It’s cheaper to get used and put new grips on than buying new.  Just get help from your local Pro on what you need to start with.

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The Golf Clubs and Accessories you play with are important because you can spend a lot of money keeping up with new technology that might or might not improve your  game.  Club accessories are grips, shafts, and club heads.  Your club Pro is your first stop in determining what clubs are right for you.  Important choices of grips, shaft flex, club head shape and groves to fit your individual swing need to be made and your club Pro can help you acquire the right clubs for you.   Remember, golf clubs can cost up to $2,000.00 for a complete new set.  So make sure they are what fits your game.   Personally, when young and having a growing family, I didn’t have extra cash laying around to upgrade to new clubs,  but keeping in touch with other golfers and the local Pro, I did a lot of horse trading for used clubs maybe a year or two old that friends had replaced.  By getting used then putting new grips and maybe lengthening the shafts(I’m 6’6″ tall) I was able to make advances and keep handicap in mid-single digit handicap.  I could still hit the ball further that almost everyone even though I didn’t have that $500.00 new driver the pros were using on tv.   So, take a hard look at cost of upgrading every year.

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